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East Meets West in Westlake Village Office

Integrative East-West medicine services at the UCLA Health office in Westlake Village combine the best of conventional Western and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

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The practice, provided by staff of the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, serves patients throughout Ventura County and the Conejo and San Fernando valleys. Physicians, acupuncturists, massage therapists and others who are trained in the principles and techniques of both Western biomedicine and TCM work together to optimize patient care and outcomes. “Most of our patients have gone through the gamut of Western medicine, having seen multiple specialists and trying many different treatments before coming to us for an alternative approach,” says Malcolm B. Taw, MD, an assistant clinical professor at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine who sees patients in the Westlake Village practice. “But increasingly, we are seeing patients earlier in the process as a way to add value to primary care.”

Conditions treated include various pain disorders, symptoms from cancer or side effects related to treatment, degenerative arthritis, sports and overuse injuries, as well as other conditions such as sinusitis, esophageal reflux and irritable bowel syndrome. The Westlake Village team incorporates therapies that include TCM acupuncture and therapeutic massage in conjunction with Western techniques such as trigger- point injections and prescription drugs. Nutrition therapy is offered from a TCM perspective, with counseling on “hot” and “cold” foods depending on the individual’s biology and symptoms. Diagnostic techniques incorporate acupoints — sensitive or tight spots throughout the body that can indicate underlying internal dysfunction — as well as tongue exams, which can offer a window into a better understanding of many conditions, Dr. Taw explains.

To read more about the UCLA CEWM's services at Westlake Village, click here to view the UCLA Health Vital Signs Winter 2015 Newsletter.

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